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Study on the freezing-thawing deformation of consolidated soils under high pressure
Received: June 13, 2016  Revised: October 21, 2016  Click here to download the full text
Citation of this paper:DaYan Wang,Wei Ma and LeLe Lei,2017.Study on the freezing-thawing deformation of consolidated soils under high pressure.Sciences in Cold and Arid Regions,(1):29~37.
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AuthorInstitutionE-mail
DaYan Wang State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China dywang@lzb.ac.cn 
Wei Ma State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China  
LeLe Lei State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China  
基金项目:This research was supported by a grant from the Na-tional Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41671069, No. 41630636) and Foundation of the State Key Laboratory of Frozen Soil Engineering (SKLFSE-ZT-31).
 
Abstract:The freezing-thawing deformation behaviors of consolidated soils under high pressure have been investigated in a high-pressure-low-temperature (HPLT) K0 consolidation apparatus with a small strain sensor. The tests cover a variety of frozen soil temperatures ranging from -2℃ to -10℃, and a series of applied pressures ranging from 1 MPa to 5 MPa. The test results show that, for the consolidated soils under high pressure, their freezing-thawing deformation was caused by the realignment and the deformation of soil particles, the phase change of water, and the water redistribution in the soil. As for the deformation produced by thermal expansion and contraction, it is about 0.04~0.05 mm, accounting for only about 7%~9% of the total deformation. Taking the freezing-thawing deformation produced by temperature disturbance as a creep deformation, the creep models of the developing soil deformation will be determined by the soil's final temperature, i.e., the desired temperature. For the soils under a desired temperature between -2℃ and -5℃, the freezing-thawing deformation develops according to a non-attenuation creep model; but for the soils with a desired temperature lower than -5℃, a full attenuation creep model is followed. The applied pressure and soil type also have a significant influence on the maximum freezing deformation. Generally, the greater the desired pressure applied, the less the maximum deformation is; and the loess freezing deformation is larger than that of sand.
keywords:freezing-thawing deformation  artificial ground freezing  K0 consolidation  high pressure
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